ROSE OF SHARON

Conversation concerning my late mother-in-law will undoubtedly rouse remembrances of her late years.  Each morning she would look out the kitchen door and view the hedge in their back yard.  Her comment was always of similar substance: “Look at the Rose of Sharon.  You know, Jesus is called the Rose of Sharon.”

We hear people talk of standing at the gates of Heaven making conversation that might be elicited in that moment.  Usually they are jokes or stories on the lighter vein.  It takes little for me to imagine Mom, having taken a look at what was before her, glancing back at us, and pointing inward saying: “THE Rose of Sharon… The revelation of Jesus is being realized!”

Winifred Walker, in her book All the Plants of the Bible, notes that the Rose of Sharon comes from the Hebrew word: chabazeleth.  It was in all probability the Tulip sharonensis.  It was “native to and grows in profusion on the Plain of Sharon which is situated between Carmel and Joppa, and is about sixty miles long”.  Early Spring produces a prolific display of these lilies in all their richness and beauty.

Our ministry has been assisted consistently by a group of men who desire to make known the Rose of Sharon.  To them we will ever remain grateful.  At the same time, they desire no plaudits of praise.  I can hear them saying: “Just keep exalting the Lord Jesus, our Rose of Sharon.”

The beauty of The Rose of Sharon and its reference to Jesus, the Savior of the world, is found in Song of Solomon 2:1.  Other passages give further light on the subject.  Israel, without the Savior, is nothing more than a desert. (Isaiah 35:1; 33:9; 35:2; Song of Solomon 5:13; 7:2; Hosea 14:5)  With Him they will blossom like the fields of Sharon in the spring.

The beauty of The Rose of Sharon in Song of Solomon 2:1, 2 is that it shows itself among the thorns.  Incomparable love is demonstrated in: “that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8)  There He is, the Rose of Sharon amongst the thorns.

See!  THE ROSE OF SHARON realized.

 

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